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Act of Repentance Resources

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OCUIR Home arrow Christian Unity arrow United Methodist arrow Acts of Repentance for Racism
Acts of Repentance for Racism PDF Print E-mail

The United Methodist Church has a history of institutional racism. Within the United Methodist structure, racism is still present. Institutional racism cannot be removed overnight, it is a process based on awareness, understanding, repentance and forgiveness. In 1996, The United Methodist Church began its conscious movement to eliminate institutional racism. Out of this movement grew Acts of Repentance.

The first Act of Repentance took place at the 2000 General Conference. A service of repentance stated the sins of racism the church was responsible for and asked the African Methodist denominations [hyperlink to list of Pan Methodists] for forgiveness. This service was followed by a four year study of United Methodist racism: Steps Toward Wholeness.

 

In 2004, a Service of Appreciation for Those Who Stayed was the second Act of Repentance. The service was dedicated to the African-Americans who have kept their membership within The United Methodist Church. Their participation has been critical to life and mission of the church and has helped their European-American counterparts to acknowledge their shortcomings. A video study was made available: For Those Who Stayed .


Truth & Wholeness: Understanding White Privilege is the theme of the third Act of Repentance. Held at the 2008 General Conference, this Act calls white United Methodists to acknowledge their unearned privilege and seek to move beyond it. A 16-minute video is available (May 2008) for study and reflection.

 
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